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What is the Hoppiest Beer?

What's the hoppiest beer?

Many people ask these questions: What is the most bitter beer? What’s the most hoppy beer? What’s the most bitter beer? What is a good hoppy beer? What is a good pale ale? What is the best IPA? Here is some information given in an attempt to answer frequently asked questions when it comes to hopped beers.

Do all beers contain hops? There are four basic ingredients to beer, but only three are essential: malted barley, yeast and water. However, beer made with only these three will be sickly-sweet and dull. Throughout brewing history, brewers have added something extra, usually a plant part of some sort, to give their beer balance and depth.

What does hoppy mean for beer? What’s a hoppy beer? Hoppy is often used as a synonym for the word ‘bitter,’ but there are plenty of beers that use loads of hops and don’t taste the least bit bitter. Some hops add bitterness while other hops add aroma. Bitterness can be quantified in a unit of measurement called IBU.

What does IBUs stand for in beer? IBU stands for “International Bitterness Units.”

What is the IBU scale for beer? What is IBU beer rating? The IBU scale measures the amount of isomerized alpha acids in a beer. In more technical terms, IBU gauges the isomerized alpha acids from hops in a beer in parts per million. Hops contain alpha acids, and when they are boiled, the alpha acids become isomerized, their physical structure starts to change, and they become bitter in flavor.

What is considered a high IBU? The more hoppy the beer, the higher the IBU. A beer’s IBU is derived from a complicated formula and is typically way below 100, with a lighter lager like beer usually has around 5-10 IBU’s, blonde ales rating around 15 to 30 IBUs and stouts, like Guinness, going up to 60 IBUs. Very hoppy beers, like imperial IPAs, can reach 80 IBU. 

Does higher IBU mean more bitter? The sweetness of malt reduces perceived bitterness,  so a beer with 20 IBUs and a minimal malt character may have significantly more bitter taste than a beer with 60 IBUs and a powerful malt profile. Beers with a high IBU, like stouts, might not taste very bitter at all because of their sweet malts.

What is the hoppiest beer in the world? Beers with massive IBUs, great if you like hops. Several brewers claim to have the hoppiest beer and they try to solidify their claim based on scientific analysis, using IBU measurements. Here are some high IBU beers:

    • 2600 IBUs – Carbon Smith F*cks Up Your Sh*t IPA
    • 2500 IBUs – Flying Monkeys Alpha Fornication
    • 2012 IBUs – Arbor FF #13 – 2012 Double Black IPA
    • 2007 IBUs – Mikkeller X Hop Juice 2007 IBU.
    • 2000 IBUs – L’Espace Public Extrême 2000.
    • 1254 IBUs – Triggerfish The Kraken.
    • 1100 IBUs – Zaftig Shadowed Mistress.
    • 1100 IBUs – Daft Badger Double IPA.
    • 1066 IBUs – Hart & Thistle Hop Mess Monster v2.0.
    • 1001 IBUs – Castelló Beer Factory – BigBang 1001IBU.
    • 1000 IBU – Mikkeller 1000 IBU
    • 1000 IBU – Invicta 1000 IBU
    • 658 IBU Dogfish Head Brewery Hoo Lawd

2600 IBUs is equivalent to 2.6% content as alpha acids, that could be getting a bit expensive to produce. Numbers like those make you wonder which of these beers is legit and which aren’t. If 2600 IBUs is possible, then I guess 10000 IBU is possible too but who would want to drink it. I guess it would be hard to swallow with 10000 parts per million, that’s 1% content as alpha acids. 

What gives beer its bitterness? Only two things typically directly affect a beer’s bitterness: roasted grains and hops. When it comes to IPAs and other types of extremely bitter beers, hops are usually to thank. Hops contain alpha acids, which provide most of the bitter flavor you taste in very hoppy beer.

Is beer supposed to be bitter? Bitterness balances the sweetness of malt. Some malts, like dark malts, are bitter because of roasting. These grains are typically found in porters and stouts, providing a bitterness that balances out the sweetness of these beer styles. When it comes to IPAs and other types of extremely bitter beers, hops provide the bitterness. Hops contain alpha acids, which provide most of the bitter flavor you taste in very hoppy beer.

Why is my beer so bitter? Excess bitterness in your beer is usually perceived on the back of the tongue, and often manifests itself as a bitter aftertaste. If bitterness is too low the beer often will have a very malty, sweet or grainy profile. Sweetness and filtration can also reduce the bitterness of your beer in many cases.

How do you reduce bitterness in beer? Pour your beer into glass n sugar. Play with this to your liking. You could try blending it with another beer, and you’d probably do this when serving. It might taste good mixed with something that has a similar malt profile but obviously less bitterness.

Which beer has most hops? What kind of beer has a lot of hops? What kind of beer is hoppy? Here are some hoppy & bitter beer styles:

  • Amber,
  • Barley wine,
  • ESB extra special bitter,
  • fresh hop,
  • Imperial IPA,
  • IPA
  • Pale ale.

Hoppy types of beer in the ale category include pale ales, wheat beers, bitters, porters, stouts, barley wines, brown ales and tripels. Hoppy beers are all the rage these days. Many ales, such as India pale ales, contain more hops which results in a slightly bitter taste to help balance the sweetness. The popularity of the IPA (India Pale Ale) style exploded in the late 2000s as brewers uncovered a nearly insatiable demand from self-proclaimed “hop heads” for more varieties and blends of hops.

What is double hopped beer? What’s a double IPA? Double IPAs are also called “Imperial” IPAs. This style takes the craving for hops and runs with it. These usually use double or even triple the typical amount of hops, but also add more malts to balance. Brewers aim to maximise the hoppiness, with bitterness between about 65 and 90 IBU, and also increase alcoholic strength. The resulting beer has huge hoppy highs and deep malty depths with an high ABV (8% to 10%) to match.

What does double dry hopped mean? What is DDH beer? Dry hopping is the process of adding hops, usually in secondary, to a beer (in the fermenter or the keg). When two rounds of dry hop additions are added to the beer it is known as double dry hopping. DDH may represent the next great innovation in pale ales, it stands for Double Dry Hopped, denoting a process that is supercharging hop flavor in some of the world’s most sought after craft beers.

What does IPA beer mean? If you don’t drink beer, you may not know what “IPA” stands for. India Pale Ales originated in England and are brewed and sold all over the world. “IPA” is an initialism for India Pale Ale, a hoppy style of beer within the pale ale category.

What does an IPA taste like? Our taste buds recognize sweet, salty, sour, umami and bitter. Bitter is certainly a major factor when tasting an IPA, as the style employs an increased amount of hops which can add what is often described as evident, bracing and even aggressive bitterness.

How did IPA beer start? India pale ale (IPA) is a beefed-up version of pale ale, made using more hops and with a higher alcohol content. Created in England, the name is a result of its popularity with British troops stationed in India in the 19th century, when the subcontinent was still a British colony.

What’s the difference between IPA and lager? IPA, also known as the Indian Pale Ale, originated as a form of an ale, as the name suggests. Brewed in warmer temperatures, ales take less time to ferment compared to lagers. As a result, this provides a stronger taste compared to a Lager. Normally, beers that contain high amounts of hops, like IPA, have a very bitter taste.

What is the difference between a pale ale and an IPA? Pale ale is a type of beer that is brewed with mostly pale malts for a more equal malt-to-hop ratio. “IPA” stands for India Pale Ale, a hoppier style of beer within the pale ale category. Double IPAs, also called Imperial IPAs, are a much hoppier style of IPAs with alcohol content above 7.5 percent by volume.

Is IPA stronger than pale ale? While IPAs are more intense than Pale Ales, that statement is directly dependent on the level of intensity of the Pale Ale. So one brewery’s Pale Ale may be stronger and more bitter than someone else’s IPA; and vice versa.

What is the difference between IPA and American pale ale?
Although American brewed beers tend to use a cleaner yeast, and American two row malt, it is particularly the American hops that distinguish an APA from British or European pale ales. The style is close to the American India Pale Ale (IPA), and boundaries blur, though IPAs are stronger and more assertively hopped.

How soon should you drink IPA? The flavor of wet IPAs depends on being consumed young even more than regular IPAs. The faster you can get an IPA from the brewery to your taste buds, the better. Avoid buying IPA older than three months, and pick beer in a beer fridge over beer on a shelf.

How many IBUs are in an IPA? IBU stands for International Bitterness Units, a measure of the bitterness in beer. A Budweiser, for example, might have 12 IBUs, while a Stone IPA might have 77. That’s what you would call a very “hoppy” beer, since much of the bitterness comes from the aroma hop flowers used in flavoring craft brews.

What does DDH IPA mean? As with so many things pertaining to beer, particularly those of the IPA variety, “DDH” is more complicated than it looks. The acronym, which stands for “double dry-hopped,” is increasingly adopted by trend-driven (and trend-setting) brewers putting out hoppy, aromatic IPAs and DIPAs.

Does Double IPA have more alcohol? Once an IPA reaches the 7-plus percent alcohol by volume (ABV) range, it’s entered Double IPA turf. And, to your question, the higher ABV is derived from more fermentable sugars, usually from malts. So yes, the grain bills will be increased to achieve a higher ABV.

What’s the difference between IPA and Double IPA? The greater amount of pale malts causes the beer to have a lighter color and flavor. “IPA” stands for India Pale Ale, a hoppy style of beer within the pale ale category. Double IPAs, also called Imperial IPAs, are a much hoppier style of IPAs with alcohol content above 7.5 percent by volume.

How much alcohol is in a double IPA? The Double IPA is higher in alcohol content than its predecessor. And while Double IPAs typically have a greater concentration of hops, it takes more malt to reach the typical 8 to 10% ABV, resulting in more complex and distinct flavors.

What does a triple IPA mean? “An intensely hoppy, very strong pale ale without the big maltiness and/or deeper malt flavors of an American barleywine. The Triple IPA may be similar to a Double IPA in hop character, but is differentiated from the style by a thick, syrupy body accented by intense hop resins that make it a heavy sipping beer.

Do IPAs have higher alcohol content? Once an IPA reaches the 7-plus percent alcohol by volume (ABV) range, it’s entered Double IPA turf. And, to your question, the higher ABV is derived from more fermentable sugars, usually from malts. The grain bills will be increased to achieve a higher ABV.

Is Guinness an IPA? Nearly every brewery has an India pale ale in its arsenal. So it should surprise no one that Guinness, the Irish beer brand synonymous with another style of ale, the stout, is getting into the IPA arms race with the Guinness Nitro IPA.

Is Porter beer bitter? Brown porters taste a bit like stronger dark milds or brown ales, malty beers with chocolate, caramel, and nut flavors alongside a varying amount of roasty bitterness. They tend to float around the 4-6% ABV range. The end result is usually a dark medium-bodied beer with a nice balance of malty sweetness and bitter hoppiness. Stouts came about when people started tinkering with their porter recipes. Today, the biggest difference between stouts and porters is the kind of malt used during brewing.

Is Guinness a hoppy beer? The Guinness Master Brewers have created a crisp amber beer with a floral, hoppy aroma, called Guiness Hop House 13 lager. They say it’s twice as smooth, half as bitter and 80% lighter in color than Guinness Draught.

Is Guinness a porter beer? Porter is a dark style of beer developed in London from well-hopped beers made from brown malt. Guinness Extra Stout was originally called Extra Superior Porter and was only given the name Extra Stout in 1840.

Is Corona a hoppy beer? Corona Extra is a Premium American Lager, being, clear, yellow, not hoppy but with a little more body than a light.

What is Bitter style beer? Bitter as a style came into their own as a type of pale ale that could be served while quite young on cask as pubs moved away from aged, vatted ale and towards fresh “running” ales. They differed from mild, another running beer, by the higher hop rates. Often they used crystal malt and were dry-hopped.

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Which Hops Have the Most Geraniol?

Geraniol Hops

Geraniol has a waxy, sweet rose odour and is found in many but not all hops. It’s found in Cascade, Citra, Centennial, Chinook, Pacific Hallertau, Southern Cross, Motueka, Aurora, and Styrian Golding hops. It isn’t found in UK Challenger, U. S. Challenger, Alsace Strisselspalt, Spalt Select, Sterling, Czech Saaz, Millennium, or German Magnum.

It’s also a primary component of the essential oils of roses, palmarosa and citronella, and is found in small quantities in geranium and lemon. It has a rose-like, floral, and citrus fruit aroma and flavor. Geraniol is also found in coriander, lavender, lemon, lime, nutmeg, orange, rose, blueberry, and blackberry. It is commonly used in perfumes and flavours such as peach, raspberry, grapefruit, red apple, plum, lime, orange, lemon, watermelon, pineapple, and blueberry.

Geraniol attracts bees but repels of mosquitoes and is used in many DEET-free repellent preparations. Geraniol is produced by the scent glands of honeybees to mark nectar-bearing flowers and locate the entrances to their hives.

It has low solubility in water, but it is soluble in common organic solvents. When oxidized, geraniol becomes geranial or citral. Geraniol is a byproduct of the metabolism of sorbate and, thus, is a very unpleasant contaminant of wine if bacteria are allowed to grow in it.

Geraniol is a moderate skin irritant and can cause allergies. Exposed to air, its oxidation products are more irritant and allergenic.

Which hops have the most geraniol? Below is a table which ranks hops in terms of their geraniol content as a percentage of the total oil content.

Variety Geraniol %
Aroma Wheel Placement Description
Brewers Gold 1.34 Fruity, Spicy Spicy, fruity characteristics, black currant
Brewers Gold (GR) 1.16 Fruity, Spicy Black currant, fruit and spice characteristics
Centennial 1.14 Citrus, Floral Medium intensity floral and citrus (lemon) tones
Styrian Aurora 0.85 Floral, Pine Intense and pleasant displaying floral, pine and hoppy characteristics
Cluster 0.83 Floral, Spicy Strong floral and spicy characteristics
Simcoe 0.66 Citrus, Tobacco/Earthy, Pine Unique passionfruit, pine, earth and citrus characteristics
Crystal 0.59 Spicy Mild, spicy and floral
Chinook 0.59 Citrus, Spicy, Pine Distinct, medium intensity spice and pine characteristics with subtle notes of grapefruit
Mosaic 0.59 Citrus, Floral, Grassy A complex array of tropical fruit, citrus, berry, herbal, earthy and pine characteristics
Bravo 0.5 Fruity, Floral Pleasant fruity and floral aroma characteristics
Warrior 0.48 Citrus, Herbal, Pine Mild and resinous with subtle citrus, pine and herbal characteristics
Galena 0.41 Citrus, Stone Fruit, Spicy Spicy, blackcurrant and citrus (grapefruit) tones
Tahoma 0.35 Citrus, Cedar, Pine Predominate citrus and lemon notes with cedar, pine, floral, pepper and subtle green melon notes.
Equinox 0.33 Citrus, Herbal, Tropical Fruit A pronounced aroma profile with citrus, tropical fruit, floral and herbal characteristics. Specific descriptors include lemon, lime, papaya, apple, and green pepper.
Sorachi Ace 0.31 Citrus, Herbal, Grassy Unique lemon and dill characteristics
Summit 0.3 Citrus, Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy Distinct spice, earthy, onion, garlic and citrus (pink grapefruit, orange and tangerine) tones
Citra 0.3 Fruity, Citrus, Tropical Fruit Strong citrus and tropical tones of grapefruit, melon, lime, gooseberry, passion fruit and lychee
Mt. Rainier 0.29 Citrus, Floral, Spicy Floral and noble aromas, with citrus and licorice overtones
Brewers Delight 0.28
Ahtanum 0.27 Citrus, Floral, Tobacco/Earthy Floral, earthy, citrus and grapefruit tones
Chelan 0.27 Citrus, Floral Mild floral and citrus characteristics
Hallertau (GR) 0.26 Mild, yet spicy, with floral and citrus tones
Mt. Hood 0.26 Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Mild, herbal and somewhat pungent or spicy
Columbus 0.26 Citrus, Spicy Pungent, black pepper, licorice characteristics with subtle citrus overtones
Palisade 0.25 Stone Fruit, Herbal, Grassy Apricot, grass and clean floral charcteristics
Hallertau 0.23 Floral, Spicy, Herbal Mild and pleasant, yet spicy, with herbal and floral characteristics
Glacier 0.23 Herbal Pleasant hop aroma
Perle 0.22 Floral, Spicy, Herbal Slightly spicy with herbal and floral characteristics
Saaz 0.22 Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy Mild spice and earth tones
Horizon 0.22 Floral, Spicy Pleasant and spicy, with floral characteristics
Sterling 0.21 Citrus, Spicy Herbal and spicy, with a hint of floral, citrus (lemon/pineapple) characteristics
Bullion 0.21 Fruity Strong and zesty blackcurrant characteristics
Ultra 0.21 Floral, Spicy Mild and pleasant with spicy, floral tones
Newport 0.2 Mild
Northern Brewer (GR) 0.18 Floral, Herbal Medium intense herbal and floral tones
Cascade 0.18 Fruity, Citrus, Floral Medium intense floral, citrus and grapefruit tones
Herkules (GR) 0.16 Floral Spicy, floral and hop notes with hints of pine, black pepper and melon
Amarillo 0.16 Citrus, Floral, Tropical Fruit Floral, tropical, and citrus (lemon, orange and grapefruit) characteristics
EKG (UK) 0.15 Floral, Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy Smooth and delicate with floral, lavender, spice, honey, earth, lemon and thyme overtones
Tettnang 0.15 Spicy Noble aroma that is pleasant and spicy
Northern Brewer 0.15 Tobacco/Earthy, Pine Medium intensity, pine and mint characteristics
Bitter Gold 0.15 No specific aroma characteristics
Magnum 0.14 No distinct aroma characteristics
Tettnang (GR) 0.14 Floral, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Mild and pleasant with balanced earthy, herbal and floral aroma impressions
WGV (UK) 0.13 Floral, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Fresh earthy, botanical and floral flavors
Millenium 0.13 Floral, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Mild and resinous with floral and herbal tones
Admiral (UK) 0.12 Citrus, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Pleasant, resinous hop aroma with hints of citrus (orange) and herbal flavors
Willamette 0.12 Floral, Spicy Mild and pleasant, with slightly spicy and floral tones
Fuggle 0.11 Fruity, Tobacco/Earthy Mild wood and fruit characteristics
Styrian Celeia 0.11 Floral Pleasant and hoppy, similar to traditional European varieties
Liberty 0.1 Citrus, Spicy Mild and spicy with subtle lemon and citrus characteristics
Golding 0.09 Floral, Spicy Mild and delicate with sweet floral characteristics
Triplepearl 0.09 Pleasant and balanced with notes of melon, orange citrus, resin, spice and pepper
Vanguard 0.08 Floral, Herbal Herbal and floral tones
Nugget 0.07 Spicy, Herbal Mild and pleasant with spicy, herbal tones
Perle (GR) 0.06 Fruity, Floral, Spicy Delicate floral, fruit, spice and mint tones
Yakima Gold 0.06 Mild and pleasant
Santiam 0.05 Floral, Spicy, Herbal Slightly spicy with herbal and floral characteristics
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Which Hops have the Most Humulene?

Humulene Hops

Humulene, also known as α-humulene or α-caryophyllene, is one of the components of the essential oil from the flowering cone of the hops plant. It’s a naturally occurring terpene, first found in hops (Humulus lulupus) from which it derives its name. It’s an isomer of β-caryophyllene, and the two are often found together as a mixture in many aromatic plants including pine trees, orange trees, marsh elders, tobacco, and sunflower plants. Humulene is also found in sage, basil, cloves, Japanese spicebush, ginseng, mint, ginger, Vietnamese coriander and cannabis.

The concentration of humulene varies among different varieties of hops but can be up to 40% of the essential oil. Humulene and its reaction products in the brewing process of beer gives many beers their earthy, woody, piney, “hoppy” aroma. It has been said that noble hop varieties have been found to have higher levels of humulene, while other bitter hop varieties contain low levels.

The ratio of humulene to caryophyllene varies from one hop variety to another, but many brewers consider a good aroma to be one that has a ratio of greater than 3:1. Such hops tend to be floral, herbal, and spicy in character.

Some varieties, such as Hallertauer Mittelfrüh and U.K. Kent Golding, may contain 30% or more of their essential oils in humulene, but, because humulene is highly volatile and hydrophobic, only trace quantities of it may actually reach the final beer. Oxidation products of humulene, on the other hand, especially humulene mono-and di-epoxides, can impart significant amounts of aroma to beer. Humulene epoxide III is one of the most potent flavor compounds in Hallertauer Mittelfrüh, for instance, a variety that is high in humulene but relatively low in total oils.

Allowing hops that are high in humulene to age in bales for several weeks prior to pelletizing will result in greater amounts of humulene epoxides, as well as other hop oil oxidation products, which some brewers believe can significantly increase the hops’s aroma potential.

Which hops have the most humulene? Below is a table which ranks hops in terms of their humulene content as a percentage of the total oil content.

Variety Humulene % Aroma Wheel Placement Description
Vanguard 51.1 Floral, Herbal Herbal and floral tones
Admiral (UK) 46.87 Citrus, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Pleasant, resinous hop aroma with hints of citrus (orange) and herbal flavors
EKG (UK) 45.95 Floral, Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy Smooth and delicate with floral, lavender, spice, honey, earth, lemon and thyme overtones
Perle (GR) 40.38 Fruity, Floral, Spicy Delicate floral, fruit, spice and mint tones
WGV (UK) 40.36 Floral, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Fresh earthy, botanical and floral flavors
Golding 39.84 Floral, Spicy Mild and delicate with sweet floral characteristics
Liberty 37.86 Citrus, Spicy Mild and spicy with subtle lemon and citrus characteristics
Fuggle 36.37 Fruity, Tobacco/Earthy Mild wood and fruit characteristics
Hallertau (GR) 36.18 Mild, yet spicy, with floral and citrus tones
Perle 35.28 Floral, Spicy, Herbal Slightly spicy with herbal and floral characteristics
Tettnang 33.59 Spicy Noble aroma that is pleasant and spicy
Willamette 33.03 Floral, Spicy Mild and pleasant, with slightly spicy and floral tones
Northern Brewer (GR) 32.41 Floral, Herbal Medium intense herbal and floral tones
Hallertau 32.39 Floral, Spicy, Herbal Mild and pleasant, yet spicy, with herbal and floral characteristics
Styrian Celeia 32.13 Floral Pleasant and hoppy, similar to traditional European varieties
Magnum 31.21 No distinct aroma characteristics
Brewers Gold (GR) 30.48 Fruity, Spicy Black currant, fruit and spice characteristics
Northern Brewer 29.44 Tobacco/Earthy, Pine Medium intensity, pine and mint characteristics
Glacier 29.08 Herbal Pleasant hop aroma
Saaz 28.18 Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy Mild spice and earth tones
Tettnang (GR) 27.12 Floral, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Mild and pleasant with balanced earthy, herbal and floral aroma impressions
Mt. Hood 26.8 Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Mild, herbal and somewhat pungent or spicy
Crystal 26.58 Spicy Mild, spicy and floral
Santiam 25.81 Floral, Spicy, Herbal Slightly spicy with herbal and floral characteristics
Herkules (GR) 25.62 Floral Spicy, floral and hop notes with hints of pine, black pepper and melon
Styrian Aurora 24.16 Floral, Pine Intense and pleasant displaying floral, pine and hoppy characteristics
Sorachi Ace 22.62 Citrus, Herbal, Grassy Unique lemon and dill characteristics
Yakima Gold 22.62 Mild and pleasant
Millenium 22.2 Floral, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Mild and resinous with floral and herbal tones
Ahtanum 20.69 Citrus, Floral, Tobacco/Earthy Floral, earthy, citrus and grapefruit tones
Sterling 19.33 Citrus, Spicy Herbal and spicy, with a hint of floral, citrus (lemon/pineapple) characteristics
Summit 19.21 Citrus, Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy Distinct spice, earthy, onion, garlic and citrus (pink grapefruit, orange and tangerine) tones
Equinox 19.07 Citrus, Herbal, Tropical Fruit A pronounced aroma profile with citrus, tropical fruit, floral and herbal characteristics. Specific descriptors include lemon, lime, papaya, apple, and green pepper.
Bullion 18.84 Fruity Strong and zesty blackcurrant characteristics
Cluster 18.82 Floral, Spicy Strong floral and spicy characteristics
Nugget 18.8 Spicy, Herbal Mild and pleasant with spicy, herbal tones
Chinook 18.35 Citrus, Spicy, Pine Distinct, medium intensity spice and pine characteristics with subtle notes of grapefruit
Mt. Rainier 17.92 Citrus, Floral, Spicy Floral and noble aromas, with citrus and licorice overtones
Amarillo 17.9 Citrus, Floral, Tropical Fruit Floral, tropical, and citrus (lemon, orange and grapefruit) characteristics
Simcoe 17.42 Citrus, Tobacco/Earthy, Pine Unique passionfruit, pine, earth and citrus characteristics
Newport 17.32 Mild
Horizon 16.36 Floral, Spicy Pleasant and spicy, with floral characteristics
Warrior 16.03 Citrus, Herbal, Pine Mild and resinous with subtle citrus, pine and herbal characteristics
Brewers Gold 15.65 Fruity, Spicy Spicy, fruity characteristics, black currant
Brewers Delight 15.22
Palisade 14.89 Stone Fruit, Herbal, Grassy Apricot, grass and clean floral charcteristics
Cascade 14.19 Fruity, Citrus, Floral Medium intense floral, citrus and grapefruit tones
Galena 13.53 Citrus, Stone Fruit, Spicy Spicy, blackcurrant and citrus (grapefruit) tones
Bitter Gold 13.49 No specific aroma characteristics
Chelan 12.66 Citrus, Floral Mild floral and citrus characteristics
Ultra 12.53 Floral, Spicy Mild and pleasant with spicy, floral tones
Columbus 11.99 Citrus, Spicy Pungent, black pepper, licorice characteristics with subtle citrus overtones
Tahoma 11.68 Citrus, Cedar, Pine Predominate citrus and lemon notes with cedar, pine, floral, pepper and subtle green melon notes.
Centennial 10.68 Citrus, Floral Medium intensity floral and citrus (lemon) tones
Mosaic 10.62 Citrus, Floral, Grassy A complex array of tropical fruit, citrus, berry, herbal, earthy and pine characteristics
Bravo 8.97 Fruity, Floral Pleasant fruity and floral aroma characteristics
Citra 8.73 Fruity, Citrus, Tropical Fruit Strong citrus and tropical tones of grapefruit, melon, lime, gooseberry, passion fruit and lychee
Triplepearl 7.2 Pleasant and balanced with notes of melon, orange citrus, resin, spice and pepper
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Which Hops Have the Most Caryophyllene?

Caryophyllene Hops

Caryophyllene is a natural terpene that is a constituent of the essential oils of hops and other plants, especially cloves, cannabis and rosemary. Caryophyllene is one of the chemical compounds that contributes to the aroma of black pepper. Some say that caryophyllene has a woody, herbal, European aroma. It has anti-inflammatory properties.

Caryophyllene, like myrcene, is used often in the perfume industry to aid in aroma dispersion. It’s found in foods including ice cream, baked goods and beverages.

Which hops have the most caryophyllene? Below is a table which ranks hops in terms of their caryophyllene content as a percentage of the total oil content.

Variety Caryophyllene % Aroma Wheel Placement Description
Vanguard 15.62 Floral, Herbal Herbal and floral tones
EKG (UK) 14.93 Floral, Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy Smooth and delicate with floral, lavender, spice, honey, earth, lemon and thyme overtones
Perle (GR) 14.67 Fruity, Floral, Spicy Delicate floral, fruit, spice and mint tones
Brewers Gold (GR) 14.61 Fruity, Spicy Black currant, fruit and spice characteristics
Admiral (UK) 14.21 Citrus, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Pleasant, resinous hop aroma with hints of citrus (orange) and herbal flavors
Perle 14.03 Floral, Spicy, Herbal Slightly spicy with herbal and floral characteristics
Fuggle 14.01 Fruity, Tobacco/Earthy Mild wood and fruit characteristics
Tettnang 13.48 Spicy Noble aroma that is pleasant and spicy
Northern Brewer 13.24 Tobacco/Earthy, Pine Medium intensity, pine and mint characteristics
Willamette 13.18 Floral, Spicy Mild and pleasant, with slightly spicy and floral tones
Summit 12.85 Citrus, Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy Distinct spice, earthy, onion, garlic and citrus (pink grapefruit, orange and tangerine) tones
Styrian Celeia 12.82 Floral Pleasant and hoppy, similar to traditional European varieties
WGV (UK) 12.54 Floral, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Fresh earthy, botanical and floral flavors
Mt. Hood 12.49 Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Mild, herbal and somewhat pungent or spicy
Golding 12.37 Floral, Spicy Mild and delicate with sweet floral characteristics
Northern Brewer (GR) 12.34 Floral, Herbal Medium intense herbal and floral tones
Warrior 12.06 Citrus, Herbal, Pine Mild and resinous with subtle citrus, pine and herbal characteristics
Palisade 11.92 Stone Fruit, Herbal, Grassy Apricot, grass and clean floral charcteristics
Horizon 11.13 Floral, Spicy Pleasant and spicy, with floral characteristics
Bullion 10.95 Fruity Strong and zesty blackcurrant characteristics
Equinox 10.9 Citrus, Herbal, Tropical Fruit A pronounced aroma profile with citrus, tropical fruit, floral and herbal characteristics. Specific descriptors include lemon, lime, papaya, apple, and green pepper.
Saaz 10.78 Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy Mild spice and earth tones
Hallertau (GR) 10.37 Mild, yet spicy, with floral and citrus tones
Chelan 10.09 Citrus, Floral Mild floral and citrus characteristics
Ahtanum 10.05 Citrus, Floral, Tobacco/Earthy Floral, earthy, citrus and grapefruit tones
Magnum 9.98 No distinct aroma characteristics
Hallertau 9.64 Floral, Spicy, Herbal Mild and pleasant, yet spicy, with herbal and floral characteristics
Brewers Gold 9.61 Fruity, Spicy Spicy, fruity characteristics, black currant
Liberty 9.58 Citrus, Spicy Mild and spicy with subtle lemon and citrus characteristics
Millenium 9.26 Floral, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Mild and resinous with floral and herbal tones
Newport 9.24 Mild
Glacier 9.11 Herbal Pleasant hop aroma
Nugget 9.07 Spicy, Herbal Mild and pleasant with spicy, herbal tones
Brewers Delight 8.8
Simcoe 8.72 Citrus, Tobacco/Earthy, Pine Unique passionfruit, pine, earth and citrus characteristics
Bitter Gold 8.62 No specific aroma characteristics
Chinook 8.5 Citrus, Spicy, Pine Distinct, medium intensity spice and pine characteristics with subtle notes of grapefruit
Cluster 8.45 Floral, Spicy Strong floral and spicy characteristics
Ultra 7.99 Floral, Spicy Mild and pleasant with spicy, floral tones
Santiam 7.88 Floral, Spicy, Herbal Slightly spicy with herbal and floral characteristics
Tettnang (GR) 7.74 Floral, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Mild and pleasant with balanced earthy, herbal and floral aroma impressions
Mt. Rainier 7.66 Citrus, Floral, Spicy Floral and noble aromas, with citrus and licorice overtones
Sorachi Ace 7.63 Citrus, Herbal, Grassy Unique lemon and dill characteristics
Columbus 7.58 Citrus, Spicy Pungent, black pepper, licorice characteristics with subtle citrus overtones
Yakima Gold 7.47 Mild and pleasant
Galena 7.44 Citrus, Stone Fruit, Spicy Spicy, blackcurrant and citrus (grapefruit) tones
Crystal 7.34 Spicy Mild, spicy and floral
Styrian Aurora 7.27 Floral, Pine Intense and pleasant displaying floral, pine and hoppy characteristics
Herkules (GR) 7.14 Floral Spicy, floral and hop notes with hints of pine, black pepper and melon
Sterling 6.66 Citrus, Spicy Herbal and spicy, with a hint of floral, citrus (lemon/pineapple) characteristics
Bravo 6.62 Fruity, Floral Pleasant fruity and floral aroma characteristics
Amarillo 6.53 Citrus, Floral, Tropical Fruit Floral, tropical, and citrus (lemon, orange and grapefruit) characteristics
Cascade 6.23 Fruity, Citrus, Floral Medium intense floral, citrus and grapefruit tones
Citra 5.58 Fruity, Citrus, Tropical Fruit Strong citrus and tropical tones of grapefruit, melon, lime, gooseberry, passion fruit and lychee
Centennial 5.23 Citrus, Floral Medium intensity floral and citrus (lemon) tones
Mosaic 4.24 Citrus, Floral, Grassy A complex array of tropical fruit, citrus, berry, herbal, earthy and pine characteristics
Triplepearl 3.92 Pleasant and balanced with notes of melon, orange citrus, resin, spice and pepper
Tahoma 3.79 Citrus, Cedar, Pine Predominate citrus and lemon notes with cedar, pine, floral, pepper and subtle green melon notes.
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Which Hops are the Hoppiest?

What's the hoppiest hop?

Which hops are the hoppiest? That depends on what you mean by hoppy. Some people associate bitterness with hops, others associate aroma and flavour with hops. Some beers with loads of hops aren’t bitter, others with loads of hops don’t have as much aroma. Hops can be added at different stages of the brew process to increase bitterness (early) or flavour and aroma (late). Let’s explore the hops contents which influence hop bitterness, aroma and flavour.

Which hops have the most flavour and aroma?

In short, the hops which have the most flavour also have the most essential oil content. Hops are partially comprised of essential oils that dictate flavour and aromatic qualities when added within the last 15 minutes of the wort boil, or when dry hopped in the fermenter. In general, hops which are boiled lose their oils; the longer they’re boiled, the less aroma and flavour they impart, except for Beta-demascenone levels which increase with boiling time. Beta-demascenone imparts a flavour of stale hops.

Hop essential oils are found in the lupulin gland, where they are formed in the final stages of hop cone maturation. As the hop cone ripens, trace amounts of oxygenated compounds of the essential oil appear first. Caryophyllene and humulene follow next, and then myrcene.

Flavours and aromas increase with the percentage of oil content in the hops. Aromas and flavours can have hints of apple, pear, melon, berry, floral, spicy, herbal, pine, resin, grass, earth/wood, onion/garlic, dank/catty, citrus, tropical fruit and stonefruit. Here is an opinion on the notes / character provided by different types of essential oils found in hops:

caryophyllene » woody (others say herbal and European)
citronellol » citrusy, fruity
farnesene » floral
geraniol » floral, rose, geranium
humulene » woody, piney (others say spicy, herbal and European)
limonene » citrusy, orange
linalool » floral, orange
myrcene » green, resinous, piney (others say floral, citrus and piney)
nerol » rose, citrusy
pinene » spicy, piney
3-mercaptohexanol » guava, tropical
3 mercaptoheyl acetate » muscat, passion fruit
4-mercapto-4-methyl-pentan-2-one » black currant, tropical

If you’re keen to develop your aroma experience, it’s possible to find isolated alpha acids for purchase.

If you’re using a blend of hops, try using a hop oils calculator to visualise the flavours and aromas on a radial graph (spider chart).

Here’s a table ranking hops by total oil content:

Variety Total oil Aroma Wheel Placement Description
Equinox 3.6 Citrus, Herbal, Tropical Fruit A pronounced aroma profile with citrus, tropical fruit, floral and herbal characteristics. Specific descriptors include lemon, lime, papaya, apple, and green pepper.
Bravo 3.2 Fruity, Floral Pleasant fruity and floral aroma characteristics
Columbus 2.9 Citrus, Spicy Pungent, black pepper, licorice characteristics with subtle citrus overtones
Citra 2.8 Fruity, Citrus, Tropical Fruit Strong citrus and tropical tones of grapefruit, melon, lime, gooseberry, passion fruit and lychee
Centennial 2.4 Citrus, Floral Medium intensity floral and citrus (lemon) tones
Sorachi Ace 2.3 Citrus, Herbal, Grassy Unique lemon and dill characteristics
Millenium 2.2 Floral, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Mild and resinous with floral and herbal tones
Nugget 2.2 Spicy, Herbal Mild and pleasant with spicy, herbal tones
Mosaic 2 Citrus, Floral, Grassy A complex array of tropical fruit, citrus, berry, herbal, earthy and pine characteristics
Chinook 2 Citrus, Spicy, Pine Distinct, medium intensity spice and pine characteristics with subtle notes of grapefruit
Brewers Gold 2 Fruity, Spicy Spicy, fruity characteristics, black currant
Simcoe 1.9 Citrus, Tobacco/Earthy, Pine Unique passionfruit, pine, earth and citrus characteristics
Mt. Hood 1.9 Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Mild, herbal and somewhat pungent or spicy
Warrior 1.8 Citrus, Herbal, Pine Mild and resinous with subtle citrus, pine and herbal characteristics
Galena 1.8 Citrus, Stone Fruit, Spicy Spicy, blackcurrant and citrus (grapefruit) tones
Newport 1.8 Mild
Triplepearl 1.8 Pleasant and balanced with notes of melon, orange citrus, resin, spice and pepper
Herkules (GR) 1.7 Floral Spicy, floral and hop notes with hints of pine, black pepper and melon
Amarillo 1.7 Citrus, Floral, Tropical Fruit Floral, tropical, and citrus (lemon, orange and grapefruit) characteristics
Santiam 1.7 Floral, Spicy, Herbal Slightly spicy with herbal and floral characteristics
Summit 1.6 Citrus, Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy Distinct spice, earthy, onion, garlic and citrus (pink grapefruit, orange and tangerine) tones
Magnum 1.6 No distinct aroma characteristics
Palisade 1.6 Stone Fruit, Herbal, Grassy Apricot, grass and clean floral charcteristics
Cascade 1.5 Fruity, Citrus, Floral Medium intense floral, citrus and grapefruit tones
Chelan 1.4 Citrus, Floral Mild floral and citrus characteristics
Bitter Gold 1.4 No specific aroma characteristics
Brewers Delight 1.4
Northern Brewer 1.4 Tobacco/Earthy, Pine Medium intensity, pine and mint characteristics
Sterling 1.4 Citrus, Spicy Herbal and spicy, with a hint of floral, citrus (lemon/pineapple) characteristics
Crystal 1.4 Spicy Mild, spicy and floral
Tahoma 1.3 Citrus, Cedar, Pine Predominate citrus and lemon notes with cedar, pine, floral, pepper and subtle green melon notes.
Northern Brewer (GR) 1.3 Floral, Herbal Medium intense herbal and floral tones
Mt. Rainier 1.3 Citrus, Floral, Spicy Floral and noble aromas, with citrus and licorice overtones
Ahtanum 1.3 Citrus, Floral, Tobacco/Earthy Floral, earthy, citrus and grapefruit tones
Horizon 1.2 Floral, Spicy Pleasant and spicy, with floral characteristics
Perle 1.2 Floral, Spicy, Herbal Slightly spicy with herbal and floral characteristics
Bullion 1.2 Fruity Strong and zesty blackcurrant characteristics
Saaz 1.2 Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy Mild spice and earth tones
Willamette 1.2 Floral, Spicy Mild and pleasant, with slightly spicy and floral tones
Perle (GR) 1.1 Fruity, Floral, Spicy Delicate floral, fruit, spice and mint tones
Liberty 1.1 Citrus, Spicy Mild and spicy with subtle lemon and citrus characteristics
Ultra 1 Floral, Spicy Mild and pleasant with spicy, floral tones
Yakima Gold 1 Mild and pleasant
WGV (UK) 0.9 Floral, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Fresh earthy, botanical and floral flavors
Glacier 0.9 Herbal Pleasant hop aroma
Styrian Aurora 0.8 Floral, Pine Intense and pleasant displaying floral, pine and hoppy characteristics
Hallertau 0.8 Floral, Spicy, Herbal Mild and pleasant, yet spicy, with herbal and floral characteristics
Brewers Gold (GR) 0.8 Fruity, Spicy Black currant, fruit and spice characteristics
Hallertau (GR) 0.8 Mild, yet spicy, with floral and citrus tones
Styrian Celeia 0.8 Floral Pleasant and hoppy, similar to traditional European varieties
Golding 0.7 Floral, Spicy Mild and delicate with sweet floral characteristics
Tettnang 0.7 Spicy Noble aroma that is pleasant and spicy
Fuggle 0.7 Fruity, Tobacco/Earthy Mild wood and fruit characteristics
Vanguard 0.6 Floral, Herbal Herbal and floral tones
Cluster 0.5 Floral, Spicy Strong floral and spicy characteristics
Tettnang (GR) 0.5 Floral, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Mild and pleasant with balanced earthy, herbal and floral aroma impressions
EKG (UK) 0.4 Floral, Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy Smooth and delicate with floral, lavender, spice, honey, earth, lemon and thyme overtones
Admiral (UK) 0.2 Citrus, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Pleasant, resinous hop aroma with hints of citrus (orange) and herbal flavors

Which hops are the most bitter?

In short, the most bitter hops have the highest alpha acid content. Bitterness increases with the percentage of alpha acids content in the hops. Bitterness in beer is measured in International Bitterness Units (IBUs) which represent the parts per million of iso-alpha acid present in a beer.

Brewers believe that alpha acids are of primary importance to consider when brewing a beer.  Beta acids are only important when considered in context with alpha acids.  As compared to humulone, the addition of some carbons on the lower part of the lupulone molecule result in beta acids being insoluble.  Alpha acids are soluble in the brewing process and are converted to iso-alpha acids.  Iso-alpha acids content is measured and reported as International Bitterness Units (IBUs).  Beta acids on the other hand are relatively insoluble during brewing and therefore do not contribute much to the perceived bitterness of beer.

Beta acids comprise a significant percentage of lupulin and hop oils.  In fact, most hops contain just as many beta acids as alpha acids.  The beta acids do not seem important during the brewing process.  However, beta acids isomerize when stored over time.  And when they isomerize, beta acids do contribute to perceived bitterness.  In fact, isomerized beta acids are perceived as being much more bitter than alpha acids (and not in a good way).  Therefore, the ratio of alpha acids to beta acids does seem to matter in the sense that a higher alpha to beta ratio is better than a low alpha to beta ratio.

Below is a list of some known alpha and beta acids:

Alpha acids:
(1) Humulone
(2) Cohumulone
(3) Adhumulone
(4) Posthumulone
(5) Prehumulone

Beta acids:
(1) Lupulone
(2) Colupulone
(3) Adlupulone

Which hops have the most alpha-acids? Here is a table ranking hops by bitterness based on alpha acid content:

Variety Alpha Aroma Wheel Placement Description
Herkules (GR) 17.2 Floral Spicy, floral and hop notes with hints of pine, black pepper and melon
Summit 17.1 Citrus, Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy Distinct spice, earthy, onion, garlic and citrus (pink grapefruit, orange and tangerine) tones
Millenium 16.8 Floral, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Mild and resinous with floral and herbal tones
Columbus 16.5 Citrus, Spicy Pungent, black pepper, licorice characteristics with subtle citrus overtones
Bravo 16.1 Fruity, Floral Pleasant fruity and floral aroma characteristics
Warrior 15.9 Citrus, Herbal, Pine Mild and resinous with subtle citrus, pine and herbal characteristics
Nugget 15.3 Spicy, Herbal Mild and pleasant with spicy, herbal tones
Equinox 15.2 Citrus, Herbal, Tropical Fruit A pronounced aroma profile with citrus, tropical fruit, floral and herbal characteristics. Specific descriptors include lemon, lime, papaya, apple, and green pepper.
Galena 14.7 Citrus, Stone Fruit, Spicy Spicy, blackcurrant and citrus (grapefruit) tones
Admiral (UK) 14.2 Citrus, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Pleasant, resinous hop aroma with hints of citrus (orange) and herbal flavors
Chelan 14.1 Citrus, Floral Mild floral and citrus characteristics
Citra 13.8 Fruity, Citrus, Tropical Fruit Strong citrus and tropical tones of grapefruit, melon, lime, gooseberry, passion fruit and lychee
Magnum 13.7 No distinct aroma characteristics
Bitter Gold 13.6 No specific aroma characteristics
Simcoe 13.6 Citrus, Tobacco/Earthy, Pine Unique passionfruit, pine, earth and citrus characteristics
Mosaic 13.2 Citrus, Floral, Grassy A complex array of tropical fruit, citrus, berry, herbal, earthy and pine characteristics
Chinook 13.2 Citrus, Spicy, Pine Distinct, medium intensity spice and pine characteristics with subtle notes of grapefruit
Sorachi Ace 11.7 Citrus, Herbal, Grassy Unique lemon and dill characteristics
Newport 11.6 Mild
Brewers Delight 11.4
Horizon 10.4 Floral, Spicy Pleasant and spicy, with floral characteristics
Centennial 10.2 Citrus, Floral Medium intensity floral and citrus (lemon) tones
Brewers Gold 10 Fruity, Spicy Spicy, fruity characteristics, black currant
Triplepearl 9.3 Pleasant and balanced with notes of melon, orange citrus, resin, spice and pepper
Ultra 9.1 Floral, Spicy Mild and pleasant with spicy, floral tones
Amarillo 9 Citrus, Floral, Tropical Fruit Floral, tropical, and citrus (lemon, orange and grapefruit) characteristics
Palisade 8.4 Stone Fruit, Herbal, Grassy Apricot, grass and clean floral charcteristics
Perle 8.3 Floral, Spicy, Herbal Slightly spicy with herbal and floral characteristics
Cluster 8.2 Floral, Spicy Strong floral and spicy characteristics
Northern Brewer 8.2 Tobacco/Earthy, Pine Medium intensity, pine and mint characteristics
Bullion 8.1 Fruity Strong and zesty blackcurrant characteristics
Sterling 8 Citrus, Spicy Herbal and spicy, with a hint of floral, citrus (lemon/pineapple) characteristics
Cascade 7.4 Fruity, Citrus, Floral Medium intense floral, citrus and grapefruit tones
Yakima Gold 7.4 Mild and pleasant
Santiam 7.4 Floral, Spicy, Herbal Slightly spicy with herbal and floral characteristics
Styrian Aurora 7.2 Floral, Pine Intense and pleasant displaying floral, pine and hoppy characteristics
Tahoma 6.8 Citrus, Cedar, Pine Predominate citrus and lemon notes with cedar, pine, floral, pepper and subtle green melon notes.
Northern Brewer (GR) 6.8 Floral, Herbal Medium intense herbal and floral tones
Mt. Hood 6.5 Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Mild, herbal and somewhat pungent or spicy
Saaz 6.3 Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy Mild spice and earth tones
Mt. Rainier 6.1 Citrus, Floral, Spicy Floral and noble aromas, with citrus and licorice overtones
Perle (GR) 6.1 Fruity, Floral, Spicy Delicate floral, fruit, spice and mint tones
WGV (UK) 5.9 Floral, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Fresh earthy, botanical and floral flavors
Willamette 5.4 Floral, Spicy Mild and pleasant, with slightly spicy and floral tones
Vanguard 5.4 Floral, Herbal Herbal and floral tones
Golding 5.1 Floral, Spicy Mild and delicate with sweet floral characteristics
EKG (UK) 5.1 Floral, Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy Smooth and delicate with floral, lavender, spice, honey, earth, lemon and thyme overtones
Glacier 5 Herbal Pleasant hop aroma
Hallertau 4.9 Floral, Spicy, Herbal Mild and pleasant, yet spicy, with herbal and floral characteristics
Tettnang 4.9 Spicy Noble aroma that is pleasant and spicy
Liberty 4.7 Citrus, Spicy Mild and spicy with subtle lemon and citrus characteristics
Brewers Gold (GR) 4.7 Fruity, Spicy Black currant, fruit and spice characteristics
Crystal 4.6 Spicy Mild, spicy and floral
Fuggle 4.4 Fruity, Tobacco/Earthy Mild wood and fruit characteristics
Ahtanum 4.3 Citrus, Floral, Tobacco/Earthy Floral, earthy, citrus and grapefruit tones
Hallertau (GR) 3.8 Mild, yet spicy, with floral and citrus tones
Tettnang (GR) 3.4 Floral, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Mild and pleasant with balanced earthy, herbal and floral aroma impressions
Styrian Celeia 2.7 Floral Pleasant and hoppy, similar to traditional European varieties

Here is a table ranking the quality of bitterness:

Variety Alpha/Beta Aroma Wheel Placement Description
Citra 3.73 Fruity, Citrus, Tropical Fruit Strong citrus and tropical tones of grapefruit, melon, lime, gooseberry, passion fruit and lychee
Bravo 3.66 Fruity, Floral Pleasant fruity and floral aroma characteristics
Mosaic 3.57 Citrus, Floral, Grassy A complex array of tropical fruit, citrus, berry, herbal, earthy and pine characteristics
Chinook 3.57 Citrus, Spicy, Pine Distinct, medium intensity spice and pine characteristics with subtle notes of grapefruit
Nugget 3.40 Spicy, Herbal Mild and pleasant with spicy, herbal tones
Simcoe 3.40 Citrus, Tobacco/Earthy, Pine Unique passionfruit, pine, earth and citrus characteristics
Warrior 3.31 Citrus, Herbal, Pine Mild and resinous with subtle citrus, pine and herbal characteristics
Summit 3.23 Citrus, Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy Distinct spice, earthy, onion, garlic and citrus (pink grapefruit, orange and tangerine) tones
Millenium 3.17 Floral, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Mild and resinous with floral and herbal tones
Equinox 3.17 Citrus, Herbal, Tropical Fruit A pronounced aroma profile with citrus, tropical fruit, floral and herbal characteristics. Specific descriptors include lemon, lime, papaya, apple, and green pepper.
Columbus 3.06 Citrus, Spicy Pungent, black pepper, licorice characteristics with subtle citrus overtones
Herkules (GR) 3.02 Floral Spicy, floral and hop notes with hints of pine, black pepper and melon
Triplepearl 2.91 Pleasant and balanced with notes of melon, orange citrus, resin, spice and pepper
Centennial 2.55 Citrus, Floral Medium intensity floral and citrus (lemon) tones
Bitter Gold 2.43 No specific aroma characteristics
Ultra 2.39 Floral, Spicy Mild and pleasant with spicy, floral tones
Brewers Delight 2.28
Golding 2.22 Floral, Spicy Mild and delicate with sweet floral characteristics
Styrian Aurora 2.18 Floral, Pine Intense and pleasant displaying floral, pine and hoppy characteristics
Perle 2.13 Floral, Spicy, Herbal Slightly spicy with herbal and floral characteristics
Magnum 2.11 No distinct aroma characteristics
Yakima Gold 2.00 Mild and pleasant
Admiral (UK) 1.97 Citrus, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Pleasant, resinous hop aroma with hints of citrus (orange) and herbal flavors
Northern Brewer 1.95 Tobacco/Earthy, Pine Medium intensity, pine and mint characteristics
Brewers Gold 1.92 Fruity, Spicy Spicy, fruity characteristics, black currant
Bullion 1.84 Fruity Strong and zesty blackcurrant characteristics
Newport 1.78 Mild
Sorachi Ace 1.72 Citrus, Herbal, Grassy Unique lemon and dill characteristics
EKG (UK) 1.70 Floral, Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy Smooth and delicate with floral, lavender, spice, honey, earth, lemon and thyme overtones
Tettnang 1.69 Spicy Noble aroma that is pleasant and spicy
Galena 1.69 Citrus, Stone Fruit, Spicy Spicy, blackcurrant and citrus (grapefruit) tones
Horizon 1.65 Floral, Spicy Pleasant and spicy, with floral characteristics
Fuggle 1.63 Fruity, Tobacco/Earthy Mild wood and fruit characteristics
Northern Brewer (GR) 1.58 Floral, Herbal Medium intense herbal and floral tones
Hallertau 1.58 Floral, Spicy, Herbal Mild and pleasant, yet spicy, with herbal and floral characteristics
WGV (UK) 1.55 Floral, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Fresh earthy, botanical and floral flavors
Cluster 1.55 Floral, Spicy Strong floral and spicy characteristics
Sterling 1.51 Citrus, Spicy Herbal and spicy, with a hint of floral, citrus (lemon/pineapple) characteristics
Chelan 1.50 Citrus, Floral Mild floral and citrus characteristics
Willamette 1.46 Floral, Spicy Mild and pleasant, with slightly spicy and floral tones
Amarillo 1.45 Citrus, Floral, Tropical Fruit Floral, tropical, and citrus (lemon, orange and grapefruit) characteristics
Liberty 1.31 Citrus, Spicy Mild and spicy with subtle lemon and citrus characteristics
Brewers Gold (GR) 1.27 Fruity, Spicy Black currant, fruit and spice characteristics
Perle (GR) 1.22 Fruity, Floral, Spicy Delicate floral, fruit, spice and mint tones
Saaz 1.21 Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy Mild spice and earth tones
Palisade 1.15 Stone Fruit, Herbal, Grassy Apricot, grass and clean floral charcteristics
Styrian Celeia 1.08 Floral Pleasant and hoppy, similar to traditional European varieties
Cascade 1.06 Fruity, Citrus, Floral Medium intense floral, citrus and grapefruit tones
Santiam 1.01 Floral, Spicy, Herbal Slightly spicy with herbal and floral characteristics
Mt. Hood 0.94 Spicy, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Mild, herbal and somewhat pungent or spicy
Vanguard 0.92 Floral, Herbal Herbal and floral tones
Tahoma 0.88 Citrus, Cedar, Pine Predominate citrus and lemon notes with cedar, pine, floral, pepper and subtle green melon notes.
Ahtanum 0.86 Citrus, Floral, Tobacco/Earthy Floral, earthy, citrus and grapefruit tones
Mt. Rainier 0.84 Citrus, Floral, Spicy Floral and noble aromas, with citrus and licorice overtones
Hallertau (GR) 0.75 Mild, yet spicy, with floral and citrus tones
Glacier 0.69 Herbal Pleasant hop aroma
Tettnang (GR) 0.69 Floral, Tobacco/Earthy, Herbal Mild and pleasant with balanced earthy, herbal and floral aroma impressions
Crystal 0.63 Spicy Mild, spicy and floral

You might also be interested in reading the answers to these questions:
Which Hops have the Most Humulene?
Which Hops Have the Most Myrcene?
Which Hops Have the Most Linalool?
Which Hops Have the Most Geraniol?
Which Hops Have the Most Farnesene?
Which Hops Have the Most Caryophyllene?

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How to Grow Hops

Chinook Hops

Last Spring I planted a couple of Chinook hops rhizomes in my backyard. I bought them on ebay from a guy down south, planted them, watered them and occasionally gave them various fertilisers which I’d bought at the local hardware store. I’ve enjoyed watching the bines grow and sprout hop flowers which are now developing a nice aroma and could be ready for picking. The flowers in the photo attached are actually my chinook hop flowers. It’s a rewarding experience.

How to grow hops? I’m no expert at growing hops, so here are some tips from the web and some answers to common questions:

Hops Growing involves considering crop rotation, soil, position, frost tolerance, feeding, companion plants, spacing, sowing and planting, harvesting and trouble shooting.

  • Buy your rhizomes in August or September.
  • Plant the rhizomes once the ground has warmed after winter. Nurture your growing plants with frequent light watering, don’t drench the rhizomes or they could rot.
  • Support the hops bines as they grow.
  • Harvest your homegrown hops when they are ready (March / April).
  • Dry your hops immediately if you plan to save them for later.
  • Store your dried homegrown hops as you would (or should) store any other hops.

Can anyone grow hops? If you like to garden, you can grow hops.

Are hops hard to grow? Hops can be difficult to grow for profit on a small scale.

How much hops do you get from one plant? A first year plant may produce no more than a couple of hundred grams hops, but by the third year some varieties will yield up to a kilo per plant. That’s as much as many homebrewers use in a single season.

Should I get male or female hops? Hop cones are from female plants. The hop plant is dioecious (male and female flowers are on separate plants). The female flowers are borne in clusters on lateral branches. 

When are hops planted? Rhizomes can be planted as soon as the soil is workable, but it’s best to plant after the final frost.

Do hops die in winter? Hops plant leaves can fall off and the vine dies back. This is especially important where freezes are sustained and the winter is long. With proper preparation, growing hops in winter are hardy to minus -20 C and will regrow in spring.

Are hops annuals or perennials? Hops are perennial deciduous plants that die back to the ground each winter and grow again the following spring. This twining bine grows up to about 6m each summer. Hop vines are long-lived, producing a harvest for years in the same location.

Can hops grow year round? Only hydroponically. A hydroponic set up will give you year-round hops growth and harvests, anywhere from two to five times a year.

What type of soil is best for growing hops? Hops will grow in a variety of soils, but do best in well drained, deep, sandy loam soils with a pH around 6.5 (slightly acidic). Growers should avoid siting hop yards in heavy, poorly drained soil.

Do hops grow in shade? Hops need full sunlight, though some shade helps in hot environments. Hops are an essential ingredient in beer, but they are also a terrific shade vine for gardeners. Growing hops is easy. They need well-worked soil in a sunny spot (with six to eight hours of sun). The rhizomes merely have to be planted with the growth tips facing up.

Can you grow hops indoors? No, except for hydroponic systems, hops should not be grown inside. Their roots need too much room to spread out, and a container is just not large enough to support the growth. These are not small plants when they grow. A lot of people are not familiar with what hops look like in a field, but most people know what grape vines look like.

Can you grow hops hydroponically? Growing hops hydroponically is one way growers are changing traditional hop production. Hydroponics offers many benefits to help satiate the thirsty beer market. Whether they’re grown in a greenhouse or using indoor lighting, hops can now be grown perpetually.

Can hops be grown in pots? Growing hops in containers can be a challenge, but — if you understand a few key elements of container gardening — you can grow healthy plants that will yield a bountiful harvest of cones. It is a great way to propagate rhizomes, as first year rhizome growth often exceeds that of in-ground hops.

Can you grow hops from cuttings? Most hops growers grow from rhizome cuttings. Harvest rhizomes for hops plant propagation in late spring and plant immediately. Cut about 15 cm of rhizome with a sharp, sterile knife and plant 5 to 10 cm below the soil surface. Rhizomes should have sent out roots by this time and begin to produce tiny shoots. Keep the plants moist but not soggy and weed free.

How deep do hop roots grow? The roots may penetrate the soil to a depth of 4m or more.

How far apart should hops be planted? Hops can be planted in rows of hills about 2.5 m apart with two rhizomes per hill and hills set about 1 m apart. If you plan to grow more than one variety of hops, plant the mixed varieties at least 1.5 to 2 m apart.

How do you take care of hops? Fertilize liberally before planting. Plant your hops in a mound and aerate the ground by turning it over several times to aid drainage, enhance growth and prevent disease. Place the rhizomes about 10 cm deep. Place the root side of the rhizome down.

Do hops spread? As the hops plant grows each year as does its roots or rhizomes. Each year the growers of hops will dig down to the roots and split the rhizomes to prevent the base of the hops plant from spreading to far.

Are hops invasive? Hops are one of the most amazing plants you’ll ever grow, but they require substantial and timely physical maintenance to produce the best hop cones and prevent invasive expansion.

How can I support hop bines? You can use a trellis, strings, rope, or any support you’d give to a vine. You can even grow hops along a sturdy fence. Full sun (at least 6-8 hours daily) is required for plant health and cone production. Choose a spot with good drainage. Start training new hop growth to the trellis when it’s about half a metre long. 

Do birds eat hops? Hungry or curious wildlife may attempt to eat the plant. Over time wildlife typically will leave the bines alone, but those first samplings may damage or destroy the plant. Birds are commonly the biggest threat to the hop flowers.

Do hops smell when growing? Smell is important in this capacity, as well as the look and feel of the plants. Hops will smell most pungent when ready for harvest, and they should appear light in color and feel dry to the touch when ready. Once harvested, hops should be dried before being incorporated into beer.

How to check hop cones for ripeness?

  • Give the cone a light squeeze. If the cone stays compressed, it’s not ripe enough. When they feel light and dry—and spring back after a squeeze—they’re ready to be harvested.
  • Pick a cone, roll it in your hands and smell it. If it has a pungent smell between cut grass and onion, it’s time to harvest.
  • Roll the hop next to your ear. If it makes a cricket sound, this also means they’re ready to harvest. If the lupulin turns orange and smells rancid, you’ve overshot your window.
  • The hop should be springy, dry and papery on the tips, and sticky to the touch.
  • Look for lupulin, the visible, thick yellow substance on the outside of the cone.

Can animals eat hops? Consuming hops in any way, other than in beer, can give you an upset stomach and a raging headache, but your pets are at a far higher risk as hops are often toxic to animals.

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Wet Hops

Wet Hops

Here are some questions which people frequently ask about wet hops.

What are fresh hops? Simply, the hop flowers are taken off the vine and immediately brewed within 24-hours instead of being processed. It’s similar to when cooking with fresh herbs versus dried herbs. When the hops are dried, the less flavor the hops have making fresh hop beer usually more flavorful and hoppy than other craft beers.

What is a Wet Hop IPA? The term ‘Wet Hop’ refers to hops that are used fresh off the vine without being processed. These can only be used during autumn immediately following harvest. The term ‘Dry Hop’ refers to a method by which hops are added during the fermentation/conditioning phase to enhance aroma and flavor.

How do you wet hop? Wet hops, just like kilned hops, can be added at any point in the boil, or into a hop-back. Adding wet hops to cool, finished beer is also gaining in popularity. The reason behind such “wet dry hopping” is the desire to capture the hops’ most delicate and volatile aroma oils in the finished beer.

Can I freeze fresh hops? Fresh hops should be used asap. Store them in a sealed bag or tub in the refrigerator. Don’t freeze fresh/undried hops. Wet hops contain 75-80% water by weight – enough to drip water if you squeeze them hard enough. Wet hops will spoil quickly so they should be used immediately after harvest.

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Australian Hops Producers

Hops Australia

There are currently two major hop producers in Australia with the total planted area estimated at around 600 hectares. Hop Products Australia Limited (HPA) produces hops in Tasmania’s Derwent river valley and in the Ovens district near Myrtleford in north‐eastern Victoria, while Ellerslie Hops has its hop yards at Myrrhee near King Valley in Victoria. Both HPA and Ellerslie Hops run private breeding/selection programs that have yielded some locally and internationally recognised and trademarked hop varieties. These companies closely control production of their varieties.

Other Australian hops producers include Ryefield Hops (NSW), Crossover Hops (SA), Hills Hops (SA), Fresh Hops Coop (SA), Possum Lane (QLD), Karridale (WA), Hopshed (WA), Hopswest (WA). These hops producers and more are listed in the tophop.com.au hops supplier directory.

Open source varieties listed by various (small scale) suppliers for sale in Australia include, but are not necessarily limited to, the following:

  • Challenger
  • Chinook
  • Cluster
  • East Kent Golding
  • Fuggle
  • Golden Cluster
  • Goldings
  • Hallertau
  • Hersbrucker
  • Kracanup
  • Mount Hood
  • Nugget
  • Perle
  • Precoce d’Bourgogne
  • Pride of Ringwood
  • Red Earth
  • Saaz
  • Target
  • Tasmanian Cascade
  • Tettnanger
  • Vienna Gold
  • Willamette
  • Wuerttemberger

On the world stage, some of these varieties are considered old and no longer widely produced, having been superseded by new varieties with characteristics preferred by brewers.

Hops Suppliers

In addition to the hops producers and suppliers listed above, there are other hops suppliers including Bintani and Hopco. If you’re looking for other raw materials including malts, check the Independent Brewers Association directory here: http://iba.org.au/directory/

Is there a hops shortage? Some craft brewers say they are battling a hops shortage. Farmers are devoting more acres to growing hops than they were five years ago, but it takes a few years for hop plants to reach their full yield.

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How to Add Hops to Homebrew

Boil Hopping

People often ask how to add hops to homebrew. Here are some tips and some common questions. 

When to add hops to beer?

You can add hops at various stages of the brewing process. Hops can be mash hopped, first wort hopped, dry hopped, boil hopped, and late hopped. Choose a technique that suits your chosen beer style. When hopping you can use fresh wet ops or usually pellet hops. Contain the hops with mash so that they don’t create a mess. Many brewers filter for clarity.

How do you use hop pellets in homebrew? Usually the pellets will dissolve during boil and settle down to the bottom of your kettle when you cool your wort. Then, when transferring to the fermenter you can just leave them behind (easier to do with a siphon). Use a hop bag – put the pellets on the bag, when you are done with the boil simply pull the bag out. Using a hop bag avoids the mess of having to strain hops from your wort.

How much hops should I add to my beer? Overall, if your dry hops plus your late hops together weigh 40–60g, you’re in the right zone. For an IPA, late hopping in the 30 – 60g per 20L range will give you the right amount of aroma, presuming you’ve dry hopped the beer.

Do you keep first hops, boil hops or late hops in for the ferment? You definitely don’t intentionally keep boiled hops in during fermentation, because they add nothing to that process. Hops added to the boil are usually left behind when draining the kettle to the fermentor, or at least if they are transferred, it is with the intent to rack off of them (and the other trub) soon.

Mash Hopping

Mash hopping is the addition of hops directly to the mash tun. Hops can be placed on top of the grain bed and left to sit as the mash is sparged. Some might say that mash hopping provides a better overall balance and character to the beer, though it adds almost no bitterness, but most people would consider it an ineffective use of hops.

Mash hopping is rarely done because it requires a fairly large amount of hops and adds little in terms of flavor. Since the hops are never boiled, no bitterness is released and most of the flavourful oils from the hop flower are lost in the boil that follows.

Brewers reckon that most of the benefits from mash hopping are due to the lowered pH (greater acidity) from mash hopping and not the hops itself. Given the high cost of hops, as well as many cheaper methods for reducing the pH of your wort, home-brewer’s rarely mash hop.

First Wort Hops

First wort hops are hops added to the boil pot at the very start of the lautering process. Unlike mash hops, first wort hops remain in the boiler during the boil and therefore do contribute bitterness to the wort.

First wort hopping is an old German method that’s made a come back. First wort beers are smoother, better blended and have less of a bitter edge and aftertaste. First hopping on lightly hopped styles reduces bitterness without upsetting the malt-bitterness balance of the beer.

Boil Hops – Bittering Hops

Do you add hops directly to wort? Bittering hops or boil hops are just that – hops added for the bulk of the boil to add bitterness to the beer. Boiling hops releases the alpha acids that provide bitterness in your beer. I will usually add my bittering hop addition at the beginning of the boil.

Boil hops aka bittering hops are added for the bulk of the boil to add bitterness to the beer. Boiling hops releases the alpha acids that provide bitterness in your beer. The longer you boil your hops, the more bitterness you will add.

Brewing calculators, such as BeerSmith (or BrewersFriend) can help estimate the bitterness for a given hop additions. In general, your bittering additions should be boiled for full length of your boil (about 60-90 minutes) to extract as much bitterness as possible. You can add your bittering hop addition at the beginning of the boil.

30 Minute additions are said to aid mouthfeel and flavor. The bitterness utilization is still fairly high, and the flavor is said to still be there.

Late Hop Additions

What is late hopping? Late hopping is the addition of hops during the latter part of the boil. It is an excellent method for creating hop aroma and flavor in your beer. In general, any additions with less than 30 minutes left in the boil and prior to cooling the wort are considered late hop additions.

Hops added in the last 5-15 minutes of the boil are called late hop additions. They’re usually not added for bittering, though they do contribute a small amount of bitterness to the beer. The main purpose for late hop additions is to add aroma and aromatic hop oils to your beer.

In addition to bittering compounds, hop cones from “aromatic” hop varieties contain volatile hop oils that provide the strong flowery aromatic flavor and scent desirable in many hoppy beer styles. Unfortunately most of these compounds boil off within 10-20 minutes of adding the hops.

Late hop additions should always use “aromatic” hop varieties, and should be done within the last 10 minutes of the boil to preserve as many aromatic oils as possible. In addition, late hop additions are most appropriate for beer styles where a hoppy flavor and aroma is needed. You would not add late hop additions to a malty or low hop beer style.

What does a 0 min boil time mean? It means putting an addition of hops at flameout, or when you turn off the kettle. Those late addition hops can add hop aroma and some nice flavor. I wouldn’t take your hops out when the boil is done for hoppy beers. Leaving those hops in while the wort cools can give you more of that aroma that some styles call for.

The Hop Back

A hop back is a device containing hops used inline between the boiler and chiller to infuse fragile hop oils and aroma directly into the hot wort before it is cooled and transferred to the fermenter. While a hop back does not add any significant bitterness to the beer, it can add great aroma to your finished beer. For more information see our article on the hop back.

Dry Hopping

Dry hopping is the addition of hops after the beer has fermented. Hops are typically added in the secondary fermenter or keg and left for a period of several days to several weeks. Dry hopping is used to add a hoppy aroma to the beer, as no bitterness is added with this method. Dry hopping is also used in many commercial beers for a hoppy burst of aroma.

The basic method is to add a few ounces of hops to the secondary before bottling. If kegging, use about half as much hops. Again you should use only aromatic hop varieties, and you should only use this method with hoppy beer styles where a strong hop aroma is desired.

Combining Hop Methods

Advanced brewers often use a combination of hop additions to achieve a burst of hop aroma and flavor, particularly for hoppy styles like India Pale Ale. In fact, many true hopheads will add substantial first wort and boil hops, followed by multiple late hop additions and a final dose of dry hops.

The “hop bursting” technique, involves adding a fraction of your bittering hops at the beginning of the boil, and the bulk of them at the very end of the boil. This method can give a great aroma and a smoother bittering.

Some try to keep things simple, so they typically add a single boil or first wort addition for bitterness, followed by a single late hop addition in the last 5-10 minutes of the boil to preserve aromatics and dry hopping if appropriate. In these hop starved times, you can also try to use higher alpha bittering hops for the main boil hops and save my precious aromatics for the late addition and for dry hopping.

On non-hoppy styles, brewers often choose to add a single bittering addition, often as first wort hops which give the smooth blending perception this method produces.

 

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Fuggle Hops

Fuggle Hops

Fuggle hops are also known as Fuggles hops and Fuggle UK. Fuggles are also identical to Styrian Golding. Fuggle is used in breeding and is parent to Willamette, Cascade, and Glacier hops.

Fuggle hops profile:

  • Purpose: Aroma
  • Alpha Acids: 2.4%-6.1%
  • Beta Acids: 2.1%-2.8%
  • Origin: UK
  • Substitutes: Fuggle (US), Willamette, Styrian Golding, Tettnanger, Newport
  • Style Guide: English Ale, Porter, Mild Ale, Bitter, Extra Special Bitter, Lambic, Amber Ale, Cask Ale, Stout, Oatmeal Stout, Strong Ale, Nut Brown Ale, Golden Ale, Christmas Ale

Here are some questions people often ask about Fuggle hops.

How do you pronounce fuggle? “Fug” rhymes with hug. The “gle” is the same as it is in giggle.

What flavour do fuggles have? Originally used as a bittering and aroma hop, fuggles have more recently been used as primarily an aroma hop. The earthy and woody characteristics of Fuggle makes a great addition in English style ales, milds, bitters and porters.

Beers with fuggles? If you want to taste a single hopped fuggle beer try Little Creatures’ The Fuggle is Real stout in a can.

Can you use Fuggles as a bittering hop? Although they were originally a bittering and aroma hop, Fuggles are now primarily used as an aroma hop. Fuggles aren’t typically used for bittering because their alpha acids are so low. They don’t have a bitter harshness but you can still use them for bittering.

Can you dry hop with fuggles? Fuggles can be grassy and earthy when dry hopped. Some people dislike fuggles dry hopped, but others have a taste for it. Love ’em or hate ’em.

What are the substitutes for fuggle hops? Fuggles can be replaced with Styrian Golding hops, Fuggle (US) hops and Willamette hops. You can also replace Fuggles with Tettnanger and Newport hops.